Statistics

Occupations of London Women1
By P. Earle

Occupations
Spinsters
Number Wives Employed Widows Total
% of Total
Domestic service203252525325.2
Charring/laundry125432989.7
Needle trade51865018718.6
Nursing/medicine7566112412.3
Catering/victualling55628898.9
Shopkeeping173035828.2
Hawking/carrying24119626.2
Textile manufacture92019484.8
Other manufacture288181.8
Other services41315323.2
Hard labour/daywork173111.1
- - - - -
313
- - - - -
396
- - - - -
295
- - - - -
1004
- - - - -
100.0

Source : Female employment sample.
1Earle, P., A City Full of People. Men and Women of London 1650-1750, (Methuen London Ltd., and imprint of Reed Consumer Books, Ltd), Table 4.3, p.116

In Tim Hitchcock and Robert Shoemaker, Economic Growth and Social Change in the Eighteenth-Century English Town (TLTP CDRom, Glasgow, 1998)

 

Occupations of married couples1
(Taken from the Old Bailey Sessions Papers. The occupations are those of the witnesses, prosecutors and prisoners appearing at felony trials at the Old Bailey.)

Man Wife
1. Sept. 1737Sells milkhawks fruit
2. July 1783“A lame man who cannot earn his bread”, lets lodgins (Shehan)keeps a green shop
3. Oct. 1797“A worker at the waterside” (dishonest)keep a broker’s shop
4. Sept. 1788Saloop seller (helps wife)saloop seller in Moorfields
5. Sept. 1728Watchmansells cakes and gingerbread
6. Sept. 1789Watchmanquilter
7. Dec. 1744Chairmansells milk
8. Dec. 1766Chairmankeeps “a house of lodgers” and sells pease porridege and sheeps heads in her shop
9. Feb. 1780Coal heaverkeeps a house for lodgers (apparently disreputable)
10. May 1748Sailor (alleged)shoplifter, says “she works at her needle”
11. Jan. 1794Foremastman on man of wardoes slop-work
12. Dec. 1735Soldiers in the Guardskeeps a milk-cellar, “the sign of the cow”
13. Jan. 1759Recruiting sergeant in the guardssells old cloths (fence), used to keep a public-house
14. Sep. 1798Soldier (made prisoner at Ostend)keeps the Feathers public-house Broadway, Westminster
15. April 1745Driver to a hackney coachmantakes in washing
16. Sept. 1767Sugar baker [labourer]takes in washing

1George, M. D., London Life in the Eighteenth Century (Penguin, Middlesex, 1979), pp. 425-428

In Tim Hitchcock and Robert Shoemaker, Economic Growth and Social Change in the Eighteenth-Century English Town (TLTP CDRom, Glasgow, 1998)

 

 

 

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